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About This Coterie

A coterie about all things historical RP.

Category

Roleplays

Rules

  1. Be excellent.
  2. Talk about all things old.
  1. What's new in this coterie
  2. Seahorse

    Accidental anachronisms

    YES THIS! Some things just go together with particular settings! Homey characters. Home cooked meals. Potatoes. What if my character doesn't want a beet or a radish? Little did they know that the toxic nature of the potato came from all that metal they were cooking on >.> Be a rebel. Eat the potato. Cut into the love apple. Can you also believe that the tea party as it is known now, especially the taking of afternoon tea, wasn't a big hit until the Duchess of Bedford was credited for it in the 1830's or so? There is proof of tea being taken prior in England as a meal of sorts, and we know the Dutch had tea gardens long before this. Coffee houses and tea houses were a thing, so it is interesting how the idea of ladies at tea is played so much prior to this point of the 19th century. It is a staple for social conversation, really! I'd argue it is almost the backbone of colonial social plays, the spreading of tea culture. One fun thing about tea is how valuable it became, what varities were fashionable over the others, and the fact that people would smuggle tea, pirate for tea! Tea, of all things! Catherine of Braganza brought it with her to England in 1662, from Portugal, on the occassion of her marriage to Charles II. It then became fashionable because the Queen made it so. You'd have to wonder, especially with the age of tea formal tea wear, if someone wasn't hip to the "tea party" even then! I hope your character gets their tea. It's important, dang it! Tea, potatoes, and apples for everyone!
  3. Kit the Human

    Accidental anachronisms

    I feel you so hard on both the tea and potatoes thing. The French really resisted the idea of potatoes (thought they were toxic) for a good long time, so my homey lady just wouldn't be cooking potatoes. And tea? Apparently, not really a thing until in the mid 1700s for England. Prior to that, green tea was apparently acceptable amongst aristocratic male society. Now, tea was more common in America thanks to the Dutch but was not publicly for sale until around 1690, this is all centered around New York. 1720 was the point that tea seemed to be properly normalised. Which is a long way of me saying that this same homey lady probably wouldn't just be pouring tea for everyone as it probably wasn't that readily available, and she ain't rich. One day, I'll write that we've captured a Dutch tea merchant and all of his wares are now in Nassau. So my lady can have a frigging cup of tea!
  4. Seahorse

    Accidental anachronisms

    I think this is a common factor in historical gaming more than we realize. Coming in to this genre, influences from books, movies, and television happen often. One thing I know that catches me up will be language particulars, like certain names. On one of my more recent WiP's, I gave a character the name Leilah. Now, granted, she has always been Leilah, or "Lee" for short. However, on researching that name? I realized she would have to get it from a traveling British ancestor because it was a name from distant part of the world (India) and in fact didn't become known in English literature until after 1800. D'oh! Hence why the mixed race Native American was given a name that has been "in the family" due to a relatives former time in the British East India Company! Things like that are easily made more "novel" or "original" to a setting with some tweaks. One large thing that has always haunted me in gaming, even Fantasy, is the drinking of tea. It is such an easy thing to break out! However, water was not a trusted source back in the Middle Ages and further onward for awhile, so most everyone was drinking something fermented. The history of tea being what it is, one day, it slapped me that unless it was a specific herbal infusion, it'd be awful hard to have tea in more true to life medieval settings. Tea culture wasn't around. Potatoes is another one! I can't tell you how many dishes I've written with that tubular only to have to fact check my history/point of origin. Another one that used to kill me was when there would be a medieval ball being written in a setting that was much more historically inspired, and I found it began to kill me when no one wrote about period dancing in lines, no folk dancing, and always wrote about the waltz. It never fails! We all have that period image of Prince Charming waltzing his sweetheart into romance....ooooonly no one was waltzing for a really long time unless you were a peasant in Germany or an Austrian/Germanic noble between the 13th-16th centuries. Even when Waltzing did come about, before it became popular? It was scandal to the max for so many who favored the stately, rigid dancers of yesteryear. So, one thing I found myself doing (and noticing others too) was including the origins of the waltz in posts, potential character reactions to said dance, and how the characters felt engaging in it. One more anachronistic port for the records! In our former alternative history 14th century Scottish group, and because who doesn't love a good seasonal play, we increased regional observations of "Yuletide" things and included Christmas trees and regional glass blowing people with a fashion for decorated Yule trees to appease the fae folk..or some such. It was AOL, and December. We were rewriting history as it was! One that occurred in our India story that was more an organized decision among a bunch of tea/chai nerds was the making of chai as some sort of "regional delicacy" that would begin to spread from our area outward, so that there would be a chai culture at our present time, and so we could include it in area tea culture. We've gone an increased the presence of women quite awhile before they arrived in larger numbers, so darn it, we shall have chai! History can be equal parts funny and entertaining.
  5. LOVE ME AND DESPAIR

    Advertise the Historical RP Coterie

    Love it =D already got it up in my sig in another place, and on here now. will stick it in our affiliates.
  6. WW1 RP, probably on the Western front. Maaaan so dark but I needs it. I just finished Robert Graves' autobiography and I'm not sure it should have given me muse but goddamn it it did. Jamestown - I started watching the show but lost interest (despite Sophie Rundle stealing my heart <3 ) but have been doing my own digging since then. I think it could be so interesting and so much room for POC and strong female characters which are always somewhat more tricky to include in a historical setting (well, not hard, but less obvious). Medieval Russia. Just for me to nerd over, I needs it.
  7. Sara

    Advertise the Historical RP Coterie

    What a fab idea!
  8. Sara

    Accidental anachronisms

    I remember frequently referring to potatoes in posts (well...not frequently but enough) before I twigged that they didn't come over for several hundred more years. That was a massive d'oh moment for Sara, I hang my head in shame. A recent one was that I made a common character and it took me two weeks, two weeks, before I realised I hadn't actually explained how she was fluent in Norman-French when she was a commoner and spoke Anglo-Saxon. Some maaaaajor rewrites of her app because I'm a bloody flipping idiot.
  9. Gothic

    Advertise the Historical RP Coterie

    This is a fabulous idea!
  10. Seahorse

    Advertise the Historical RP Coterie

    This is awesome! I shall make sure to spiff may signature up with it shortly!
  11. Hullo all! I made a couple of buttons for you to use in your signatures and forums if you like. Animated Static It'd be great to coax more historical nerds over here for the open sharing of resources and of ideas, thoughts and opinions!
  12. Kit the Human

    animated-historicalrp.gif

    From the album: Historical RP Buttons

  13. Kit the Human

    Historical RP Buttons

    Affiliate sized buttons for you to use freely in your signature and your forum.
  14. Kit the Human

    static-historicalrp.jpg

    From the album: Historical RP Buttons

  15. LOVE ME AND DESPAIR

    Accidental anachronisms

    Huh, you know. . . this isn't something I generally think to hard about when writing. Outside of obvious things that wouldn't fit the time, but at the same time sometimes I don't think of stuff that does fit cause I think it doesn't for some reason. Now I'm curious though. Going to have to look at some of my posts and see if I've done this anywhere. Of course, it's not something I really pay attention to when writing. If I did it would probably drive me up a wall lol
  16. Kit the Human

    Accidental anachronisms

    Have you committed any accidental anachronisms? I have two that I remember/know so far. Nothing big! But I was surprised to learn that they came later. The name Flynn (easy fix) and apparently kraken wasn't a term until around 1752 and even then it was Danish. My dumb American colonist in the early 18th century certainly wouldn't be using the word. Not game breaking or glaring (to me)! Still made me go, oh whoops! Let's retcon. Have you got any silly ones you'd like to share?
  17. Kit the Human

    Useful Resources

    I have added the links above and added another clothing related resource! Thanks for that link @Sara it turns out I had an anachronistic name in play easy fix!
  18. Kit the Human

    What Historical RPGs would you like to see more of?

    Jacob reminded me of how great the Dark Ages to write in would be. Very atmospheric. This in turn reminded me of the Deverry Cycle by Katherine Kerr - I have long held love for what little we know about the Celts because of the Deverry Cycle.
  19. Elena

    Why Historical RP?

    I have read historical books for children and I loved them. So yes, I was hooked on history before fifth grade. I have read Hiawatha by Longfellow (retold for children) in first grade and I loved it. There were books with adventures from my country's history too, with princes who were fighting the Ottoman conquerors, and I loved that. Then I got a book about Egypt... then the Westerns (Karl May, Fenimore Coooper, Liselotte Welskhop Horner, etc) and in the sixth grade cape & epee (Alexandre Dumas, Michel Zevaco, Paul Feval, Victor Hugo). Writing historical fiction means getting immersed in a different culture, civilization, time and setting, with their specifics, and time travelling... while able to return, at the end of the day, to my hot bath and running water toilet.
  20. Bishop

    Why Historical RP?

    Ok so here is my true confession on why I've always liked it over the rest.... When I was growing up and even still, I had a severe learning disability. Enough that I had to take special english and math classes. (Special Ed for the win! No child left behind victim.) Anyway, for me reading comprehension was very very very very very very hard. I didn't read my first chapter book until the third grade and it was only because I had watched the movie first. So I really missed out on a lot of those fantasy starter books that most children read growing up. The one subject in school I really excelled at? History. So when high school came around I enjoyed the open topics and the easy to follow very structured stories that came with folklore and just typical lives of those in history. And to me, at least in my experience, a lot of RP's are based on or influenced by some sort of book, movie, game and they were hard for me to get into. I was a huge Tolkien fan (which was the first series I was able to read and enjoy, but again...movies) and even now I have to stop myself and make notes as who is who in other books. My BFF wrote me a game of thrones map, but I had to stop about three books in. So for me, the research makes it easy to understand. I like that there are plenty of pictures or articles on the same subject. I love the art of the eras and the science that was happening.
  21. Sara

    Why Historical RP?

    I just adore exploring a world that is tangible but so very different from our own. I like the idea that these things really happened and these people really lived that way. I think with modern settings, I find it all a bit familiar - I use RP as an escape to let off steam, and with fantasy or sci-fi, I just can't visualise a lot of the plots or settings because it's so different to our own. I also suppose I'm just a massive nerd and history has always been my passion. I also like exploring the fringes of different eras which aren't usually explored.
  22. Jacob

    Why Historical RP?

    I consider myself a historically-minded man. The love of days of yore goes back to childhood. Research is fun, especially when I can see a boy at work. Threads roll like movies in my head, so it's me looking through his eyes. There are more concept options available when I'm drawing up a character. Oliver Twist, my favorite novel, serves as the basis. Its titular role has inspired both a seventeenth century musico and a 19th century werewolf. From 2012-2013, I have/had a female canon forced to adapt herself to our time. Putting another historical figure in such a situation again is thought-provoking. I might do so via the evirato if I come across the opportunity. Last, the Dark to Middle Ages are my best-loved. They show up in personal decor, as well as current genealogical expeditions. I hope to find immigrant ancestors descended from medieval Western royalty on my mother's side.
  23. Kit the Human

    Why Historical RP?

    A chance to waffle on about historical rp. What could be more glorious? ...Other than actually RPing I enjoy the research and trying to bring the research and details to life. I love trying to get into that mindset and realising the interactions between personhood, time and place. Reimagining the setting so that it is still true to time, but fleshed out with diversity (that doesn't ignore the setting) is fun. I adore working with the limitations and challenges of the time. It's playing with the boundaries amd colouring between the lines. I find the creative challenge very satisfying. What do you love about historical RP?
  24. Sara

    Useful Resources

    The one resource I think I use the most out of any, across my years on Historical sites is S-Gabriel. I am a real stickler for historically accurate names and THIS resource has saved me so many times <3
  25. I have been devouring this series and just had to share. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/p/women-gender-and-sex-in-history.html I love that whole entire show, but this series has been so nice to listen to as I work on my next chapter in Venice. I have been listening to them as I paint each day and I just love love love and had to share! Do you have a favorite historical podcasts you listen to?
  26. Jacob

    How do you get into time period?

    Research is a vital undertaking for me. I actually am a genealogist offline, so I've applied it to here. Character names aren't simple; thus, I use real ones. My template starts with a loosely inspired version of Charles Dickens's titular Oliver Twist. Even though I'm now an adult, I prefer penning boys than men. Watching Oliver Twist's 1985, 1999, and 2005 films sets the original's outline. An adolescent girl from a genteel family gets pregnant outside of wedlock. Given her father's reputation, she runs away and dies anonymously in a poorhouse just moments after her son enters. His identity lies in a lavish locket stolen by the covetous nurse. My character's fate is determined via administrator('s)(/s') mythos. I listen primarily to traditional music, which does provides me scenes I might parallel. English vocalist Kate Rusby purchases tattered books containing folk ballads with often lost melodies. She composes new tunes so they can be heard. If my character's mum and dad love(d) each other, Andrew Lammie and "Matt" Hyland are great inspiration. All God's Angels captures a woman abandoned by the married father of their unborn baby. I visualize my applications and my threads like a movie. Those raw emotions quickly kickstart it/them. Studying historical artwork of all kinds gives off overall clothing imagery--the default attire. My current project's is preferably akin to the garb of mezzo-soprano castrato Marc'Antonio "Pasqualino" Pasqualini (1614-3rd Jun. 1691) as painted by artist Andrea Sacchi (30th Nov. 1599-21st Jun. 1661). The face claim I've chosen comes from Sweden, so I have imaginatively replaced leopard's pelt with wolf pelt; red tights with blue tights; brighter red laces with brighter blue laces on the sandals. (He (a soprano castrato) has proven more complex than early drafts.) Operatic costumes in Il Sant'Alessio (1631) by Stefano Landi (1587-28th Oct. 1639) and countless librettos I keep amassing resemble Italian clothing.
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